Tag Archives: Testing

Regression Testing

Regression testing is a type of software testing that seeks to uncover new software bugs, or regressions, in existing functional and non-functional areas of a system after changes such as enhancements, patches or configuration changes, have been made to them.

The purpose of regression testing is to ensure that changes such as those mentioned above have not introduced new faults. One of the main reasons for regression testing is to determine whether a change in one part of the software affects other parts of the software.

Common methods of regression testing include rerunning previously completed tests and checking whether program behavior has changed and whether previously fixed faults have re-emerged. Regression testing can be performed to test a system efficiently by systematically selecting the appropriate minimum set of tests needed to adequately cover a particular change.

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Smoke Testing

Smoke testing is the initial testing process exercised to check whether the software under test is ready/stable for further testing.

The term ‘Smoke Testing’ is came from the hardware testing, in the hardware testing initial pass is done to check if it did not catch the fire or smoked in the initial switch on.

Prior to start Smoke testing few test cases need to created once to use for smoke testing. These test cases are executed prior to start actual testing to check critical functionalities of the program is working fine. This set of test cases written such a way that all functionality is verified but not in deep. The objective is not to perform exhaustive testing,the tester need check the navigation’s & adding simple things, tester needs to ask simple questions like “Does the program run?”, “Does it open a window?”, or “Does clicking the main button do anything?”

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Compatibility Testing

The compatibility part of a testing methodology tests that the product or application is compatible with all the specified operating systems, hardware platforms, web browsers, mobile devices, and other designed third-party programs (e.g. browser plugins). Compatibility tests check that the product works as expected across all the different hardware/software combinations and that all functionality is consistently supported.

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Usability Testing

The usability testing part of a testing methodology looks at the end-user usability aspect of the software. The ease with which a user can access the product forms the main testing point. Usability testing looks at five aspects of testing, – learnability, efficiency, satisfaction, memorability, and errors.

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Security Testing

Previously, security was something that was tested after-the-fact. With the rise in cyber-crime and the awareness of the risks associated with software vulnerabilities, application security is now something that needs to be designed and developed at the same time as the desired business functionality. Security testing tests the software for confidentiality, integrity, authentication, availability, and non-repudiation. Individual tests are conducted to prevent any unauthorized access to the software code.

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Performance Testing

There are several different types of performance testing in most testing methodologies, for example: performance testing is measuring how a system behaves under an increasing load (both numbers of users and data volumes), load testing is verifying that the system can operate at the required response times when subjected to its expected load, and stress testing is finding the failure point(s) in the system when the tested load exceeds that which it can support.

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Acceptance Testing

The acceptance testing part of a testing methodology is the final phase of functional software testing and involves making sure that all the product/project requirements have been met and that the end-users and customers have tested the system to make sure it operates as expected and meets all their defined requirements:

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System Testing

The system testing part of a testing methodology involves testing the entire system for errors and bugs. This test is carried out by interfacing the hardware and software components of the entire system (that have been previously unit tested and integration tested), and then testing it as a whole. This testing is listed under the black-box testing method, where the software is checked for user-expected working conditions as well as potential exception and edge conditions.

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Integration Testing

The Integration testing part of a testing methodology is the testing of the different modules/components that have been successfully unit tested when integrated together to perform specific tasks and activities (also known as scenario testing). This testing is usually done with a combination of automated functional tests and manual testing depending on how easy it is to create automated tests for specific integrated components.

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Unit Testing

The Unit testing part of a testing methodology is the testing of individual software modules or components that make up an application or system. These tests are usually written by the developers of the module and in a test-driven-development methodology (such as Agile, Scrum or XP) they are actually written before the module is created as part of the specification. Each module function is tested by a specific unit test fixture written in the same programming language as the module.

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