open_basedir

Limit the files that can be accessed by PHP to the specified directory-tree, including the file itself. This directive is NOT affected by whether Safe Mode is turned On or Off.

When a script tries to access the filesystem, for example using include, or fopen(), the location of the file is checked. When the file is outside the specified directory-tree, PHP will refuse to access it. All symbolic links are resolved, so it’s not possible to avoid this restriction with a symlink. If the file doesn’t exist then the symlink couldn’t be resolved and the filename is compared to (a resolved) open_basedir .

open_basedir can affect more than just filesystem functions; for example if MySQL is configured to use mysqlnd drivers, LOAD DATA INFILE will be affected by open_basedir . Much of the extended functionality of PHP uses open_basedir in this way.

The special value . indicates that the working directory of the script will be used as the base-directory. This is, however, a little dangerous as the working directory of the script can easily be changed with chdir().

In httpd.conf, open_basedir can be turned off (e.g. for some virtual hosts) the same way as any other configuration directive with “php_admin_value open_basedir none”.

Under Windows, separate the directories with a semicolon. On all other systems, separate the directories with a colon. As an Apache module, open_basedir paths from parent directories are now automatically inherited.

The restriction specified with open_basedir is a directory name since PHP 5.2.16 and 5.3.4. Previous versions used it as a prefix. This means that “open_basedir = /dir/incl” also allowed access to “/dir/include” and “/dir/incls” if they exist. When you want to restrict access to only the specified directory, end with a slash. For example: open_basedir = /dir/incl/

The default is to allow all files to be opened.

Note:

As of PHP 5.3.0 open_basedir can be tightened at run-time. This means that if open_basedir is set to /www/ in php.ini a script can tighten the configuration to /www/tmp/ at run-time with ini_set(). When listing several directories, you can use the PATH_SEPARATOR constant as a separator regardless of the operating system.

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